Monday, August 4, 2014

Location in Photography - What does it tell us?

Places can suggest story ideas or speculate on the people who inhabit these areas.

Up in these heights. . .wildlife roams and humans on the run hide in the heavily treed crevasses. Hunters and trackers know these mountains.



Winter Landscape near Merritt, BC, Canada, by DG Hudson
 

The color image above of British Columbia interior mountains looks as if it's black and white or Monochrome. As for the weather, it was a very grey day sapping the skies of the sun that would highlight the color of the evergreens.

***

A Bridge runs above this scene

Steam is the only thing moving in the railway yard image below.


Steam Engine, New Westminster, under Queensborough Bridge by Green Eye

Railcars on the left side appear to be either left for hook-and-haul rail companies OR it's rolling at a slow pace. Imagine the hissing of the steam and the huge steam engine motors amping up as the traffic roars across on the bridge above this scene.

What you don't show can be just as telling as what you choose to highlight.


***
Meet me at the General Store. . .

The equivalent of a corner store in the interior of British Columbia. That rectangular box looking thing is a telephone booth on the right side of the building, for those not recognizing such an entity. This is a combination gas pump, grocery and general store. A welcome site to the weary traveler or the locals coming for gas.


Winter at the General Store, Interior BC, by DG Hudson


What if there were a murder close to this location? What if the owner is the perpetrator? Or does the tracking team meet here to go into the mountains to look for the murderer in his hideout? That's what isolated locations suggest to me. . .maybe I've read too many suspense tales.

***

How much importance do you give to location?  Is setting or location important in your story? Do you photograph interesting sites for future use as inspiration or 'just in case'.

As a blogger, I always consider that I might want to use an image for a post.

Please leave a comment to let me know you were here. I'll respond!
I'm slow blogging and still trying to visit other blogs for August, as I tend to personal matters close to home. Also, a BIG thanks to those who have been so supportive regarding hubs. It helps.

****

18 comments:

  1. I'm no photographer, but location is absolutely crucial to a story. I just have to rely on memory, or "the internal camera" since I'm not so good with a real one. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anyone can learn to have a 'camera eye', guys, but try it before the beer in the shower, eh? I agree, location is important in my stories too.

      Delete
  2. I love those scenes of monochromatic elegance - and mystery. They speak to my heart. Loudly.
    And I love a story which paints its location in broad brush strokes leaving me to fill in the details.
    How is your husband? And you? Thinking of you both sending care and healing through the ether.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hubs is doing much better, and I think it's the huge amount of healing energies from nice people like you and other bloggers. His aunt, who is Native or First Nations people, called on all the ancestors to help as well. Right in the ICU unit. I'm hanging in there with the help of all of you and family too.
      Glad you enjoy the photos! Photography is important so other people get to know places they might not get to see in person. You have the exotic where you live.

      Delete
  3. Well you've seen my blog so yeah, I am fond of shooting scenic locations. lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, that's why I'm always dropping by to see what's new, JoJo.

      Delete
  4. Location is important to the reader too.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The general store looks so desolate. A few years ago I went to a writers' workshop and one of the sessions had to go with using geography for inspiration. The place I chose led me to a poem. Some authors, such as Thomas Hardy, are know for making their locations kind of a character in their novels. I think that's cool.

    Love,
    Janie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do too. A location can set the mood for a dark tale or a beach read.

      Delete
  6. It was gray and rainy when I was in BC last year. All my mountain photos look like I took them in black and white. Very Ansel Adamsish effect you have going there in Canada. :P

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, the Pacific Northwest is known for it's rain, but the locals here say they have webbed feet. I like the coolness. And, on sunny days the view is magnificent. It's a lot like San Fran as far as weather. I love it here. Late July and early August is best bets for good weather.

      Delete
  7. All of these images are just fantastic, D.G. Though bereft of a large color spectrum, they hum with a palette of whites and greys that communicates movement in one, grandeur in another and fresh stillness in the other. Just lovely. Nicely-done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, and you have made it sound so beautiful, Suze. Your magic with words is evident.

      Delete
  8. Location photograph can really tell a lot. Thanks for sharing the great shots.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I focus mainly on characterization, but setting is important to keep readers grounded in a scene. Nice photos -- I like the monochrome values.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Characterization is very important, Milo, but in the two wips I'm working on, setting is crucial. I'm glad you like the images.

      Delete

Comments will be reviewed before they show on the blog.