Saturday, July 26, 2014

History - Fort Jefferson and the Dry Tortugas

An isolated fort 70 miles away from nearest land, a place where everything had to be brought by ship. This fort was established to be a guardian for the young USA.


Fort Jefferson
The Dry Tortugas


Lower Archways of  Ft. Jefferson, Dry Tortugas, by DG Hudson


The cannon slots in the end wall are narrowed to keep out the enemy's cannonballs, but the range of the cannons firing was limited from those locations. Wide areas such as those above were more suited to moving of military equipment and supplies within the structure.


***
Parade Ground and Courtyard
circa 2006
Fort Jefferson marching grounds, black Lighthouse on right, by DG Hudson


***

Two level archways in the rainy mist overlook deserted grounds at Fort Jefferson. Park employees live here for several weeks at a time to assist with tour information and oversee repairs and restoration. Hurricanes and storms have caused damage to the fort as recently as 2004.


Fort Jefferson, The Dry Tortugas, by DG Hudson
 


Fort Jefferson Moat

From this point of view, the fort does look like the prison that it was. High walls, small windows and a place for security guards to observe on the upper level. But where would any escapees go without a boat?


Fort Jefferson Moat, Dry Tortugas Nat'l Park by DG Hudson


***

Do you like to explore historical locations? Have you ever 'motored' south of Miami to Key West? Do you take adventure tours to offshore spots like the Dry Tortugas?

Please leave a comment to let me know you dropped by, and I'll respond. I'm blogging slower through the month of August, but I will post when I can.

***

References:

Wiki on the Dry Tortugas
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dry_Tortugas

For more blog information on Fort Jefferson refer to a previous post
Key West, Florida - A Vacation to Remember

More Fort Jefferson
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Jefferson,_Florida

***

14 comments:

  1. I came late to a love of history - but it has got me firmly in its grasp now. And I often wish that the stones could talk - despite worrying that I may not like some of what I would hear.
    I hope that your husband is improving - and that you are looking after yourself as best you can.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. World history has always been a favorite of mine, and reading encouraged it. Thanks for the good wishes, Elephant's Child. Much appreciated. As best I can is about right.

      Delete
  2. Fascinating!!! I've NEVER heard of this place before. I had to go look it up before I scrolled down to see you'd included the Wikipedia link. I do love to explore historic places, but on my own and not with a tour group.

    Is your husband OK?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I always include links to back up my own observations, JoJo, I enjoy the research on a place before and after I've seen it myself. Thanks for asking, will reply on your blog.

      Delete
  3. You know I love history. Museums and historic locations are my thing. Never ventured to the Keys though. But one of these days.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To drive the highway with nothing but water and the next key and the 7 mile highway stretch has long been on my list of things I wanted to do. Plus I'd heard the pirate stories about Key West.

      Delete
  4. the archetecture is amazing here!! love these photos :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Pop Champagne! Considering the time, and the effort, this fort is an amazing feat. Thanks for visiting.

      Delete
  5. I love history, I just don't have the monetary funds to travel the world and see it firsthand. Till I do, I guess that's why I'm thankful that blogs like this can help me experience it as much as I can from the comfort of my own home.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And it's much easier to enjoy places vicariously now, ABFTS, which is what I do for months preceding any vacations. We couldn't travel much for several years when the kids were young. IF you want to travel, you can find a way. It just might take a while to do it. A project.

      Delete
  6. Having lived in the UK for the first part of my life I tended to get my fill of historical sites. Visited quite a few on this side of the pond but not for years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think I've got my fill yet of historical sites, and I'd love to see those in the UK. I've seen some in Canada, some in the USA and some in Paris, France. Thanks for visiting the blog, Jo.

      Delete
  7. I LOVE to explore historical locations. And really anywhere I visit I find myself thinking about those who have stood on the same spot where I'm standing in the past.
    I wouldn't want to be one of the park employees living at this Fort. I would imagine there is a spooky energy there at times. Love the architecture.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not surprised Julie that you would think of the spooky energy at the Fort, considering the tales you tell. I wonder if any of those ghosts who died there still roam those corridors. I'd worry more about the storms that hit the Gulf.

      Delete

Comments will be reviewed before they show on the blog.